A photostream of all sorts of images pertaining to NASA's space shuttle program.

All photos are credited to their respective photographers; click through to see the original source.

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Though astronauts and cosmonauts often encounter striking scenes of Earth’s limb, this very unique image, part of a series over Earth’s colorful horizon, has the added feature of a silhouette of the space shuttle Endeavour. The image was photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member prior to STS-130 rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station. Docking occurred at 11:06 p.m. (CST) on Feb. 9, 2010. The orbital outpost was at 46.9 south latitude and 80.5 west longitude, over the South Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern Chile with an altitude of 183 nautical miles when the image was recorded. The orange layer is the troposphere, where all of the weather and clouds which we typically watch and experience are generated and contained. This orange layer gives way to the whitish Stratosphere and then into the Mesosphere.
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The three main engines of space shuttle Discovery is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member during a backflip maneuver performed as the shuttle approaches the International Space Station. Docking occurred at 2:44 a.m. (CDT) on April 7, 2010.
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The station’s robotic Canadarm2 grapples the Leonardo Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) from the payload bay of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131) for relocation to a port on the Harmony node of the International Space Station. The bright sun and Earth’s horizon provide the backdrop for the scene. Canadian-built Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is visible at bottom center.
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The aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery and the station’s robotic Canadarm2 are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station. The northwestern coast of Australia and the Indian Ocean, roughly from Carnarvon on the left to Broom (just before the clouds) on the right with the arc of Eighty Mile Beach obscured by the tail of Discovery are seen approximately 215 miles below.
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Dwarfed by space shuttle Discovery, NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio (right) and Clayton Anderson, both STS-131 mission specialists, are seen working in Discovery’s aft payload bay during the mission’s third and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Mastracchio and Anderson hooked up fluid lines of the new 1,700-pound tank, retrieved some micrometeoroid shields from the Quest airlock’s exterior, relocated a portable foot restraint and prepared cables on the Zenith 1 truss for a spare Space to Ground Ku-Band antenna, two chores required before space shuttle Atlantis’ STS-132/ULF-4 mission in May.
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A portion of the aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131), Mexico, Baja California, and the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station.
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The docked space shuttle Discovery is featured in this image photographed by an STS-131 crew member on the International Space Station. The Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module is visible in Discovery’s payload bay.
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The space shuttle Discovery flies with its payload bay facing Earth so that the astronauts and cosmonauts onboard the International Space Station could survey and photograph it following the relative separation of the two spacecraft on April 17.
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Pictured from a window on the International Space Station, the aft section of the docked space shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the station.
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Backdropped against the Andes Mountains near the border of Argentina and Chile, the space shuttle Atlantis is shown making its relative approach to the International Space Station, from which this photo was taken. Center point coordinates of the pictured area are 34.6 degrees south latitude and 69.9 degrees west longitude. Rio Atuel is in the river valley in the lower right of the photo and the Atuel Caldera is near the center of the image by the port payload bay door.
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